October 29, 2020 4:19 pm
Home » Life » Woman Regrets Jumping Fence At Zoo To Take Selfie With Jaguar After Injury

Woman Regrets Jumping Fence At Zoo To Take Selfie With Jaguar After Injury

A woman attempted recently jumped the fence at the Wildlife World Zoo near Phoenix and was mauled by the Jaguar inside the enclosure. The woman was reportedly attempting to take a selfie with the jaguar when she was hurt. The woman suffered severe lacerations to her arm, but her injuries were not life-threatening.

Footage taken by witnesses on the scene shows the woman crying and bleeding while lying on the floor. In the footage and photos that were taken at the scene, a deep wound visible on her arm where her skin had torn open.

Wildlife World Zoo has made the following remarks in a tweeted statement, “We regret to inform that this evening, before closing there was an incident reported involving a guest, who crossed over the barrier to get a photo, according to eye witnesses. The visitor sustained non-life threatening injuries to their arm from one of our female jaguars. At the request of the family, paramedics were called. At no time was the animal out of its enclosure. The incident is being fully investigated.”

A woman attempted recently jumped the fence at the Wildlife World Zoo near Phoenix and was mauled by the Jaguar inside the enclosure. The woman was reportedly attempting to take a selfie with the jaguar when she was hurt. The woman suffered severe lacerations to her arm, but her injuries were not life-threatening.

Footage taken by witnesses on the scene shows the woman crying and bleeding while lying on the floor. In the footage and photos that were taken at the scene, a deep wound visible on her arm where her skin had torn open.

Wildlife World Zoo has made the following remarks in a tweeted statement, “We regret to inform that this evening, before closing there was an incident reported involving a guest, who crossed over the barrier to get a photo, according to eye witnesses. The visitor sustained non-life threatening injuries to their arm from one of our female jaguars. At the request of the family, paramedics were called. At no time was the animal out of its enclosure. The incident is being fully investigated.”

In a follow-up statement, the zoo clarified that the jaguar would not be euthanized since the incident was not their fault.

“We can promise you nothing will happen to our Jaguar. She’s a wild animal, and there were proper barriers in place to keep our guests safe- not a wild animals fault when barriers are crossed. Still sending prayers to her and her family,” the statement said.

A witness, Adam Wilkerson told CNN that he heard somebody yelling for help. Wilkerson’s mother was able to distract the jaguar by shoving a bottle of water into the cage.

“Without thinking, I had no idea what I was going to see, I just ran over there. I saw the other girl up against the fence with her arm caught in the jaguar’s claws. I could see the claws in her actual flesh,” Wilkerson said.

“When my mom put the water bottle through the gate, the jaguar let go of the girl. And we pulled the girl back, and she collapses,” he added.

study recently published in the Journal of Family Medicine and Primary Care reported that at least 259 people died taking selfies between October 2011 and November 2017.

The study concluded that:

“From October 2011 to November 2017, there have been 259 deaths while clicking selfies in 137 incidents. The mean age was 22.94 years. About 72.5% of the total deaths occurred in males and 27.5% in females. The highest number of incidents and selfie-deaths has been reported in India followed by Russia, United States, and Pakistan. Drowning, transport, and fall form the topmost reasons for deaths caused by selfies. We also classified reasons for deaths due to selfie as risky behavior or non-risky behavior. Risky behavior caused more deaths and incidents due to selfies than non-risky behavior. The number of deaths in females is less due to risky behavior than non-risky behavior while it is approximately three times in males.”

To arrive at these figures, researchers scanned the web for news stories associated with the terms “selfie deaths; selfie accidents; selfie mortality; self-photography deaths; koolfie deaths; mobile death/accidents” and then simply totaled up the incidents. The study’s authors, however, noted the possibility that additional deaths may not have been reported by the media and were therefore not recorded in the study.

Selfie deaths aren’t always caused by falls. Attempting to get close up to wild animals for a picture has also taken numerous lives.

Wikipedia has kept a running list of people who were killed or injured while trying to take selfies since 2011.

In 2015, a report from Mashable noted that more people are actually killed taking selfies than were killed in shark attacks the previous year. These findings led many other outlets to extrapolate that taking a selfie is actually more dangerous than smoking cannabis.

People being killed or injured by wild animals while trying to take selfies is unfortunately common. Last year, an Indian man was mauled to death while attempting to take a selfie with a bear.

“The irony is that people usually take these photos because they love animals. But behind that selfie, there’s often a lot of abuse. If you’re having a picture taken with a tiger cub, chances are that it’s been dragged out like a prop then taken back to its cage at night when tigers should be allowed to roam. To get that picture of a lifetime, it might have taken a lifetime of animal cruelty,” Chiara Vitali, of World Animal Protection, told The Independent last year.

Source: anongroup